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April 13, 2017 · 3:18 pm

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Patriotism, as I understand it, is a combination of love of country, pride in its history, traditions and culture, and a determination to add to its prestige and achievements” -Lemass

Welcome to my website. I hope that it can be a useful resource in staying up to date with my work on your behalf in Seanad Eireann as Deputy Leader of Fianna Fáil and Spokesperson for Foreign Affairs, the Irish Overseas and Diaspora.

If you have any queries, questions or ideas please do not hesitate to contact me.

Is mise le meas,

Senator Mark Daly

Seanadóir Marcus O’Dalaigh

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Should there be guidelines for the Irish National Anthem? Irish gov seeks Irish American opinions

Irish Senator Mark Daly is calling on Irish Americans to have their say on the most appropriate way for the Irish State to treat Amhrán na bhFiann.

Should there be guidelines in place for how and when the Irish National Anthem is used and how it is respected? In light of the recent NFL anthem protests, Irish Senator Mark Daly, Rapporteur of the Seanad  [Senate] Public Consultation Committee, is calling on the millions of Americans who claim Irish heritage to have their say on how we treat the Irish National Anthem, Amhrán na bhFiann (or The Soldier’s Song in English).

Any Irish person, wherever they are in the world, is welcomed to take part in the public consultation by sending their views to the committee on the most appropriate way that the Irish State can treat and respect the anthem and whether this calls for guidelines to be put in place to ensure that it is respected in this way.

“Amhrán na bhFiann / The Soldiers’ Song is a crucial and core part of how the State commemorates events and people. It is right that we have rules and guidelines in place to ensure it is treated with respect,” said Fianna Fáil Senator Daly.

“The Committee, and I, are very clear in our determination to hear and receive as many views and opinions as possible on the National Anthem.

“Our National Anthem should be respected and used appropriately. It is used right across the State, and abroad, to signify and commemorate important events and occasions. It’s only right that we have clear guidelines in place, and it’s equally right that the Irish people are involved in designing those same guidelines.”

The Irish National Anthem, in both Irish and English, has been out of copyright since 2012, leaving some concerned that the national symbol is now left in a precarious position where it could be disrespected.

“The basis of this public consultation comes from the recent change to the copyright of both the music, and lyrics, in Irish and English of Amhrán na bhFiann. All are now out of copyright since 2012, and it’s imperative that rules and guidelines are put in place to protect the anthem,” continued Daly.

“The lack of strict copyright in place for the national anthem has left this important state symbol exposed.”

In particular, the recent protests taking place across the USA where sports players are choosing to take a knee during the National Anthem to highlight systematic racism within the country and the unwarranted police brutality that has led to the deaths of many innocent black men and women, has caused the Senate committee to contemplate how the Irish anthem should be treated.

“The issue of the NFL protest is part of the discussion in Ireland, on what to do in the event of a protest during the playing of the anthem,” Daly said in an email to IrishCentral.

While the #TakeAKnee protests, sparked by former San Francisco 49ers Quarterback Colin Kaepernick, have since moved outside of the NFL itself to high school and college football leagues, as well as to leagues in other sports, it is yet to appear within Irish teams.

 The Irish National Anthem has been out of copyright for five yearsThe movement was first highlighted and brought to mainstream public attention by Kaepernick, who has since found himself without a job in the NFL, in 2016, a year in which the US police killed at least 1,093 people, according the The Guardian’s database, The Counted. Almost a quarter of the people killed by the police were black, despite the fact that they only make up roughly twelve percent of the US population.

So far in 2017, the Killed By Police monitoring group has recorded that at least 954 people have been killed by the police in the US.

The #TakeAKnee protests have courted much controversy in the US, where right-wing President Donald Trump has called for any players who don’t participate in the theatrics surrounding the national anthem to be fired.

The NFL commissioner this week refused to punish players who kneel for the anthem, causing Trump’s Make America Great Again Committee to launch a petition stating that the “president has asked for a list of supporters who stand for the national anthem.”

The Irish National Anthem has previously been criticized by some for its alleged outdatedness, militarism, and anti-British sentiment while others argue that this is true of national anthem generally.

There are very few protocols already in place when the Irish National Anthem is being played. If an Irish tricolor (the Irish national flag) is present or being hoisted, one should face the flag while the anthem is being played.

Daly has previously attempted to implement legislation regarding the anthem, introducing the National Anthem Protection of Copyright and Related Rights Bill 2016 last year. This bill got no further than the Seanad.

The Senator believes that the national anthem should not be used for commercial purposes, citing the time that Irish store Dunnes Stores used the words of the anthem in English to promote a clothing range designed by a former Kerry footballer as an example.

Copyright in Ireland expires 70 years after the death of the author meaning that Amhrán na bhFiann was no longer protected under copyright from 2012 onward, 70 years after the death of the Soldier’s Song author, Peadar Kearney. The copyright to the anthem had previously been held by the Irish state.

All those interested in submitting their views on the manner in which the Irish National Anthem should be treated in the future are asked to submit their thoughts to seanadpublicconsult@oireachtas.ie before November 2, 2017.

Once the submissions have been received from the public consultation, they will be discussed by the Seanad Public Consultation Committee who will decide whether there is a need for guidelines, protocols, or legislation to be put in place to protect the anthem.

 

https://www.irishcentral.com/news/should-there-be-guidelines-for-the-irish-national-anthem-irish-gov-seeks-irish-american-opinions

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FF Senator calls for public views on how to treat out-of-copyright national anthem

Fianna Fáil Senator Mark Daly has today calling on people to make their views known on how the State should treat the national anthem, Amhrán na bhFiann.

“Amhrán na bhFiann is a crucial and core part of how the State commemorates events and people. It is right that we have rules and guidelines in place to ensure it is treated with respect,” said Senator Daly, who was recently appointed as Rapporteur of the Seanad Public Consultation Committee.

“The Committee, and I, are very clear in our determination to hear and receive as many views and opinions as possible on the National Anthem.

“The basis of this public consultation comes from the recent change to the copyright of both the music, and lyrics, in Irish and English of Amhrán na bhFiann. All are now out of copyright since 2012, and it’s imperative that rules and guidelines are put in place to protect the anthem.

“The lack of strict copyright in place for the national anthem has left this important state symbol exposed.

“Our National Anthem should be respected and used appropriately. It is used right across the State, and abroad, to signify and commemorate important events and occasions. It’s only right that we have clear guidelines in place, and it’s equally right that the Irish people are involved in designing those same guidelines.

“I’m calling on all with an interest in this issue to make a submission and to have their views heard. Submissions can be made until November 2, 2017 and can be made by sending them to seanadpublicconsult@oireachtas.ie”.

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‘It is one of the main symbols of the State’ – Senator warns against risk of ‘inappropriate’ use of national anthem

‘It is one of the main symbols of the State’ – Senator warns against risk of ‘inappropriate’ use of national anthem

Kathy Armstrong

 

Our national anthem is at risk of being exploited by advertisers, a Senator has claimed.

The copyright for Amhrán na bhFiann (The Soldier’s Song) expired in 2012, 70 year after the death of writer author, Peadar Kearney.

Fianna Fail Senator Mark Daly called the use of our national anthem for advertising purposes “inappropriate” and is urging the public to give their thoughts about the issue.

Speaking on Newstalk Breakfast, he said: “It is one of the main symbols of the State,  the harp and the flag are the other two – both of which are protected by the State.

“The harp has a patent on it by the State and the protocol division of the Taoiseach’s office has responsibility over the flag, which was updated last year.

“A clothing company used it for an online advertising campaign and they were able to do so as the copyright had fallen out of existence.

“What we’re asking the public is should there be protocol and guidelines for this? Should legislation be brought in?

“Should advertisers be allowed to use the national anthem or should we leave that to the court of public opinion in regards to what I believe is an inappropriate way?

“This is their anthem and they should have a say in it.”

He said that other nations have enshrined the protection of their national anthems in law.

He said: “We have looked at other jurisdictions and what they have done – in some countries they have fined people for not singing it with vigour, in Canada they simply defined the lyrics and music in legislation and then left it up to the public to decide when someone using it should be supported, especially in advertising.

“By and large people don’t disrespect their national anthems in other jurisdictions.”
Senator Daly also gave an insight into Ireland’s history  with the song.

He said: “It was adopted in the early years of the State in 1926, back in the foundation of the State but it was sang in the GPO during Easter Week 1916, so it’s history goes back a long way.

“It is there for the most important state occasions and 100 years after the 1916 Rising it was sung against outside the GPO, it is a key symbol of the State.”

He said that when he noticed the copyright on the anthem was about to expire he urged the government to protect it and there have been two attempts since to do so, both of which have failed.

He added: “The national anthem belongs to everyone and that’s why we are asking people’s opinions.

“Given the fact that it has now fallen out of copyright we are asking the public to get involved in the public’s Seanad consultation process.

“We are inviting submissions from all citizens, particularly Transition Year history students on what the State should do now that it’s no longer protected by copyright.”
For more information please email info@oireachtas.ie

http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/news/it-is-one-of-the-main-symbols-of-the-state-senator-warns-against-risk-of-inappropriate-use-of-national-anthem-36220347.html

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Daly expects passage of Recognition of Irish Sign Language for the Deaf Community Bill by year end 

ISL Amendments  – Civil Rights for 50,000 members of the deaf community will now be enshrined in law - 

Fianna Fáil Senator Mark Daly has said that he expects his bill, the Recognition of Irish Sign Language for the Deaf Community Bill, to be passed by both Houses of the Oireachtas and signed into law by the President before the end of 2017.

Senator Daly made the prediction as the bill passed Final Stage in the Seanad this evening.

“We have worked really hard since the Bill passed Committee Stage in the summer to improve it, and to ensure that it would be acceptable to the Government.

“Having worked with all sides, I am confident that the Bill when it goes before the Dáil will receive unanimous support and will be passed very quickly. This bill is desperately needed by the members of the deaf community in Ireland to end their extreme marginalisation.

“It is simply unfair that they are not able to access State services in a language that they use and understand. This Bill not only gives rights to the deaf community but also puts responsibility on the Government.

“While we are at a point where there is support for the bill from all sides of the political divide, it wasn’t always like this. Fine Gael in the Seanad fought us tooth and nail, and it took a lot of convincing to bring them onside.

“That has now happened, and the passage of this bill through the Seanad is an important step on its journey to full enactment by the Oireachtas and the President.

“I am proud of this Bill. Fianna Fáil looks forward to its enactment, and yearn for the day when members of the Irish Deaf Community can go about their lives and do their business with the State in the language of their choosing,” concluded Senator Daly.


 

 

 

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Daly calls for public to give their views on Amhrán na bhFiann



– 2nd Nov deadline for submissions to Committee –
 


“Amhrán na bhFiann is a crucial and core part of how the State commemorates events and people. It is right that we have rules and guidelines in place to ensure it is treated with respect,” said Senator Mark Daly.

Daly, who was recently appointed as Rapporteur of the Seanad Public Consultation Committee, is calling on people to make their views and opinions known on the most appropriate way for the State to treat and respect our National Anthem, Amhrán na bhFiann.

“The Committee, and I, are very clear in our determination to hear and receive as many views and opinions as possible on the National Anthem.

“The basis of this public consultation comes from the recent change to the copyright of both the music, and lyrics, in Irish and English of Amhrán na bhFiann. All are now out of copyright since 2012, and it’s imperative that rules and guidelines are put in place to protect the anthem.

“The lack of strict copyright in place for the national anthem has left this important state symbol exposed.

“Our National Anthem should be respected and used appropriately. It is used right across the State, and abroad, to signify and commemorate important events and occasions. It’s only right that we have clear guidelines in place, and it’s equally right that the Irish people are involved in designing those same guidelines.

“I’m calling on all with an interest in this issue to make a submission and to have their views heard. Submissions can be made until 2nd November 2017 and can be made by sending them to seanadpublicconsult@oireachtas.ie,” concluded Daly.

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