Category Archives: Britain

The welfare of the aging Irish community in England is an issue of serious concern to all Irish people. The Senator is working with all those in government and those organisations which seek to improve the situation of many who immigrated to England in the past 60 years.

Implementation of the Good Friday Agreement meeting 9th Feb 2017

Implications for Good Friday Agreement of UK Referendum Result (Resumed): Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform

Senator Mark Daly: Information on Mark Daly Zoom on Mark Daly As my colleague, Deputy Smith, pointed out, the difficulty about the Dutch Parliament’s understanding of our position is that it is not unique. I understand from meetings Fianna Fáil members had with some of the Sicilian and Italian parliamentarians that they thought Ireland is leaving the EU because Northern Ireland is leaving. This is the challenge we face. Malta had some understanding but, in reality, it requires a lot of education because there is so much going on and so much information-sharing and laying out of our position. One of the big challenges the Government faces is that while Theresa May has made her statement, we need to set out our asks and say what we want. Deputy Sherlock pointed out the votes that took place in Westminster. What is being said by the British Government and what it is doing are two entirely different things. Theresa May when she was Home Secretary said the hard Border would of course return if there were a Brexit. Then she became Prime Minister and said there would of course be no return to a hard Border. Now she says the Border will be as frictionless as possible. The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, James Brokenshire, says there will be no special deal for Northern Ireland. The lack of understanding in Westminster could be put in the following way. While Westminster was trying to emphasise the importance of Northern Ireland in terms of the impact of Brexit, one of its reports which the House of Lords produced stated that – I thought it was a very telling line – the relationship between Ireland and Britain has not always been a smooth one. This would have to be the greatest understatement of any diplomat in the history of the State. The report’s analysis of the impact was such that its authors dismissed everything that would suit us and would do everything to suit themselves. The UK currently has an operation called Operation Gull whereby people leaving Belfast, Derry and Larne are profiled and 752 people have been arrested on immigration grounds.  It already has immigration controls between the North of Ireland and Britain. That is the solution to not having a hard Border. It has to accept that when 40,000 people were employed in the security forces in the North, the Border could not be secured. Trying to secure it now would be foolhardy, whereas it is already carrying out immigration controls at the three exit points from Northern Ireland to Britain. Yet, it will not reimpose that. The House of Lords has said that it cannot be done for political reasons, even though exactly the same system was in place between 1939 and 1952 and, under it, identify checks were carried out on people travelling from the North to Britain.

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Implications for the Good Friday Agreement of UK Referendum Result

Joint Committee on the Implementation of the Good Friday Agreement Debate

Implications for Good Friday Agreement of UK Referendum Result (Resumed): Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform

Senator Mark Daly: Information on Mark Daly Zoom on Mark DalyAs my colleague, Deputy Smith, pointed out, the difficulty about the Dutch Parliament’s understanding of our position is that it is not unique. I understand from meetings Fianna Fáil members had with some of the Sicilian and Italian parliamentarians that they thought Ireland is leaving the EU because Northern Ireland is leaving. This is the challenge we face. Malta had some understanding but, in reality, it requires a lot of education because there is so much going on and so much information-sharing and laying out of our position. One of the big challenges the Government faces is that while Theresa May has made her statement, we need to set out our asks and say what we want. Deputy Sherlock pointed out the votes that took place in Westminster. What is being said by the British Government and what it is doing are two entirely different things. Theresa May when she was Home Secretary said the hard Border would of course return if there were a Brexit. Then she became Prime Minister and said there would of course be no return to a hard Border. Now she says the Border will be as frictionless as possible. The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, James Brokenshire, says there will be no special deal for Northern Ireland. The lack of understanding in Westminster could be put in the following way. While Westminster was trying to emphasise the importance of Northern Ireland in terms of the impact of Brexit, one of its reports which the House of Lords produced stated that – I thought it was a very telling line – the relationship between Ireland and Britain has not always been a smooth one. This would have to be the greatest understatement of any diplomat in the history of the State. The report’s analysis of the impact was such that its authors dismissed everything that would suit us and would do everything to suit themselves. The UK currently has an operation called Operation Gull whereby people leaving Belfast, Derry and Larne are profiled and 752 people have been arrested on immigration grounds.  It already has immigration controls between the North of Ireland and Britain. That is the solution to not having a hard Border. It has to accept that when 40,000 people were employed in the security forces in the North, the Border could not be secured. Trying to secure it now would be foolhardy, whereas it is already carrying out immigration controls at the three exit points from Northern Ireland to Britain. Yet, it will not reimpose that. The House of Lords has said that it cannot be done for political reasons, even though exactly the same system was in place between 1939 and 1952 and, under it, identify checks were carried out on people travelling from the North to Britain.

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WATCH: Senator Mark Daly’s Speech on the Brexit Referendum

 

During debates on UK-EU Relations in Seanad Eireann Senator Mark Daly spoke why the people of the United Kingdom should vote to remain in the EU in the referendum on 23 June 2016.

 

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Motion 17th June 2015 on the release of files held by the British government concerning Dublin-Monaghan bombings

SEANAD ÉIREANN
Fógra Tairisceana: Notice of Motion:
“That Seanad Éireann, recalling the motions by Dáil Éireann adopted unanimously on 10th July, 2008 and 18th May, 2011 which:

–          noted ‘the interim and final reports of the sub-Committee of the Joint Committee on Justice, Equality, Defence and Women’s Rights on the report of the Independent Commission of Inquiry into the Dublin-Monaghan Bombings and the three related Barron Reports, including the Inquiry into the Bombing of Kay’s Tavern, Dundalk, and commends the sub-Committee for its work’;

–          urged ‘the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to allow access by an independent, international judicial figure to all original documents held by the British Government relating to the atrocities that occurred in this jurisdiction and which were inquired into by Judge Barron, for the purposes of assessing said documents with the aim of assisting in the resolution of these crimes’; and

–          directed ‘the Clerk of the Dáil to communicate the text of this Resolution, together with copies of the aforementioned reports, to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, with a request that the matter be considered by the House of Commons’;

–          notes that the question of obtaining access to information held by the British Government on the bombings has been pursued for many years;

–          requests the Government to continue to raise the matter with the British Government and to press it to comply with the request and affirms the support of Members of this House; and

–          acknowledges that the cooperation being sought is taking place in the context of transformed relationships on this island and between Ireland and Britain based on mutual respect, on partnership and on friendship.”

            – Senators Darragh O’Brien, Mark Daly, Thomas Byrne, Terry Leyden, Marc MacSharry,   Paschal Mooney, Brian Ó Domhnaill, Denis O’Donovan, Labhrás Ó Murchú, Ned        O’Sullivan, Jim Walsh, Mary White, Diarmuid Wilson, Paul Bradford, David Norris, Mary    Ann O’Brien.

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British Ambassador should be called in by Minister for Foreign Affairs to answer questions on evidence of collusion in murder of Irish Citizens as a result of RTE documentary

The murder of Catholics by the British Army and Government exposed by RTE requires a full enquiry by the Foreign Affairs and the Good Friday Agreement Committees.

Senator Mark Daly, a member of the Oireachtas Foreign Affairs Committee, last week proposed that there would be a joint enquiry with the Good Friday Agreement Committee into the growing evidence of a coordinated, planned and deliberate campaign of murder and terror by the British Government with the full knowledge and approval of the British Prime Minister. A decision will be made this Wednesday at the committee meeting on a joint enquiry.

“As a result of the RTE programme ‘Collusion’ showing the knowledge by British Prime Ministers of the murder of Catholics with British army assistance, it is time for the Irish Government to stop asking and start demanding” stated Senator Daly.

“Soft diplomacy has got us nowhere it’s time to ask the EU, UN and the Hague war crimes tribunal to carry out investigations. The British Prime Minister and State were no better than a third world dictatorship ordering a terror campaign by murder gangs who deliberately and indiscriminately murdered Catholic and Irish Citizens.

The evidence is that in the case of the Dublin and Monaghan Bombings, which was the biggest mass murder in the history of the state, the British army were involved. Yet despite a motion passed by the Dail, despite the British government being accused of mass murder of Irish Citizens on the streets of our towns and cities, this British government and the Prime Minister David Cameron has refused to release the files that would show it was not involved. The only conclusion the Irish people can come to is that the files would show its responsibility for this mass murder of Irish people.”

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