Category Archives: A United Ireland in Peace and Prosperity

In 2017, Senator Daly was appointed rapporteur by the Oireachtas Joint Committee on the Implementation of the Good Friday Agreement of the report Brexit & The Future of Ireland, Uniting Ireland and its People in Peace & Prosperity. Full information on the report including all submissions and reference documents are available at https://senatormarkdaly.org/uniting-ireland-in-peace-prosperity/

Section 1 Recommendations

The Irish government must negotiate for Northern Ireland to be
designated with special status within the EU and for the whole island
of Ireland to have a unique solution as part of the Brexit negotiation.

If current EU funding programmes cannot be protected then the
eligibility of Northern Ireland for receipt of EU Structural funds and
other funding schemes and mechanisms must be clarified as a matter
of urgency, to help underpin the peace process.

The Report on the All-Ireland Economy: compiled in 2016 by Peadar
Tóibín TD for the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Jobs, Enterprise and
Innovation in the light of Brexit should be updated.

Any passport controls between Ireland and the UK should be along the
same basis as for people traveling between these islands from 1939 to
1952. There should not be a return to passport controls on the borders
between the North and South of Ireland.

Given the likely impact on certain categories, including women, in border
counties and employment in these areas there is a need for impact
analysis on these sectors of society

Further research into the income and expenditure for Northern Ireland
should be carried out

Section 2 Recommendations

Welcome the declaration agreed to by the European Council on 29 April
2017 which provides for Northern Ireland automatically becoming part of
the EU in the event of a future united Ireland.

This declaration known in Brussels as ‘The Kenny Text’ is similar to that
of Commission President Jacque Delors in January 1990 on the issue of
German Unification ‘East Germany is a special case’.
Section 3 Recommendations

It is recognised that World Trade Organisation rules and a hard border
would have a detrimental impact on Ireland North and South & Further
impact assessment is required on the economic impact of reunification.

The Committee urges that the matter of EU funding for Northern Ireland and
the border region remains high on the agenda and an expeditious solution is
found for successor programmes after 2020.

Section 4 Recommendations

The establishment of a New Ireland Forum 2 is recommended to set a
pathway to achieve the peaceful reunification of Ireland.

Establish an international task force with experts in security so that plans to
meet any risks may be devised and implemented.

Fears and concerns of the Unionist community need to be examined,
understood and addressed comprehensively by all stakeholders in advance
of any referendum.

The legacy issues in society outlined by Senator Frances Black and the
inter- generational impact of the troubles in terms of mental health
consequences and substance abuse needs to be addressed
Section 5 Recommendation

Explore potential solutions to resolve disputes that may arise from the
implementation of the Good Friday Agreement, as recommended by High Court
Justice Kevin Humphreys.

Section 6 Recommendation

Lessons from referendums need to be learned to ensure that the Irish
government fulfils its constitutional obligations.

Section 7 Recommendation

The Government needs to carry out an audit in relation to the
legal and constitutional changes pre and post-unification

Research Report “Brexit and the future of Ireland, uniting Ireland & its people in peace & prosperity”

Cover as Image

Below is the executive summary and recommendations for the report on Brexit & The Future of Ireland, Uniting Ireland and its People in Peace & Prosperity.  Links to each of the seven sections are also below.

The Report and all its recommendations are available here in a 1 page document United Ireland and its People in Peace and Prosperity Report 1 Pager

Introduction
“The EU needs to prepare for a united Ireland.”
Taoiseach Enda Kenny July 2016
Niall O’Connor the political journalist for the                                                                                Irish Independent
Reporting from the McGill Summer School in July 2016

As a result of this statement by the Taoiseach it is also clear that Ireland needs to
prepare for a united Ireland. The Joint Committee on the Implementation of the Good
Friday Agreement in its work programme approved by Dáil Éireann appointed Senator
Mark Daly as rapporteur to compile a report on the effect of Brexit on Ireland, what
Ireland should seek to have in the final agreement between the EU and the UK,
particularly in the event of the people of Northern Ireland voting for a united Ireland andwhat Ireland needs to do in order to peacefully achieve its constitutional obligation, as described by Attorney General Brady (2002-07), of a united Ireland, as outlined in

Article 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution

The report for the Joint Committee on the Implementation of the Good Friday
Agreement has seven sections;

Contents

Section 1 : Brexit & its impact on Ireland

Section 2 & 3 : Precedent of German Reunification for Ireland & Economic Modelling of Unification

Section 4 : Brexit and the Future for Ireland

Section 5 : Good Friday Agreement

Section 6 : Referendum as Provided for in the Good Friday Agreement

Section 7 : Constitutional & Legal Changes Before & After a Referendum

Annexes

All the recommendations for each of the seven sections are at the end of this
introduction, as are all the seven summaries that relate to them. The report to the
Joint Committee also serves as a reference document and includes online copies of Acts and Agreements relating to Ireland and Britain from the Act of Union to the Good Friday Agreement.

High Court Justice Richard Humphreys book ‘Countdown to Unity’ is quoted from
extensively in Senators Daly’s Report. Justice Humphrey’s publication lays out the road
map to the peaceful unity of Ireland and its people. It outlines the various options for the
future of this island and the opportunities and the obstacles that are ahead to achieve the
aim of a peaceful united Ireland which was approved by 94% of the citizens of this state
in a referendum. Other than the New Ireland Forum of 1984, 33 years ago, the Library
and Research Service of Leinster House were unable to find any report by any previous
Government, Department or Oireachtas Committee on how the state would achieve its
core belief of a united Ireland, an objective supported by 79 per cent of people in an
opinion poll in 2016.

Professor Emeritus of Humboldt University in Berlin, Christain Tomuschat’s submission
to the report outlines the precedent in German unification for Northern Ireland’s
automatic inclusion in the EU without the need for an application or accession process
in the event of a vote for reunification.

White House, National Security Council, Senior Policy Advisor on counter terrorism in
President Obamas administration, Michael R. Ortiz has also written a paper for Senator
Daly’s report on the threat of future paramilitary violence attempting to subvert a
referendum and reunification as provided for in the Good Friday Agreement. Michael
Ortiz was the first U.S. diplomat focused on countering violent extremism and was
appointed by Secretary of State John Kerry.

Congressman Brendan Boyle a member of the US House of Representatives Foreign
Relations Committee has submitted a specially commissioned research paper from
the United States Congressional Research Office which is included in this report. This
analyses the true nature of the income and expenditure of Northern Ireland. A report
by Dr. Kurt Hubner of the University of British Columbia shows a reunification scenario
with a boost of 35.6billion euro over eight years to an all island economy. The report for
the Joint Committee also includes elements of the UK House of Lords report on Brexit;
UK- Irish Relations with a particular focus on the common travel area, including
proposals to ensure the continued free movement of people across the border with
Northern Ireland. The economic challenges of Brexit and unification are outlined in
various reports including some from the House of the Oireachtas Library and Research
Service, a key one of these is the analysis of the United Nations Human Development
Index, which measures health, education, and income. The UN report ranks Ireland as
8th in the world alongside Germany, Canada and the United States. In Northern
Ireland’s case the analysis places it 44th in the world alongside the likes of Hungry and
Montenegro. As a result of Brexit, Northern Ireland is likely to drop below 50th joining
the likes of Kazakhstan and Belarus.

This report includes submissions by various politicians, academics and experts from
Ireland, England, Germany and the United States who have given generously of their
time and their experience to assist Senator Daly in compiling it, the first by any
committee of the Irish parliament on how to achieve a united Ireland.

To conclude we include an extract from ‘Irish man of the 20th century’ T K
Whittaker’s‘Note on North-South Border Policy’ written on the 11 November 1968 the
eve of ‘The Troubles’. In it he foresaw the Good Friday Agreement, the long term
nature of achieving a united Ireland, that it required the best of ourselves and a
collective understanding.

 

‘We were, therefore, left with only one choice, a policy of seeking unity in Ireland between Irishmen. Of its nature this is a long-term policy, requiring patience, understanding and forbearance and resolute resistance to emotionalism and opportunism. It is not the less patriotic for that’

Summary of Recommendations

Section 1 Recommendations

The Irish government must negotiate for Northern Ireland to be
designated with special status within the EU and for the whole island
of Ireland to have a unique solution as part of the Brexit negotiation.

If current EU funding programmes cannot be protected then the
eligibility of Northern Ireland for receipt of EU Structural funds and
other funding schemes and mechanisms must be clarified as a matter
of urgency, to help underpin the peace process.

The Report on the All-Ireland Economy: compiled in 2016 by Peadar
Tóibín TD for the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Jobs, Enterprise and
Innovation in the light of Brexit should be updated.

Any passport controls between Ireland and the UK should be along the
same basis as for people traveling between these islands from 1939 to
1952. There should not be a return to passport controls on the borders
between the North and South of Ireland.

Given the likely impact on certain categories, including women, in border
counties and employment in these areas there is a need for impact
analysis on these sectors of society

Further research into the income and expenditure for Northern Ireland
should be carried out

Section 2 Recommendations

Welcome the declaration agreed to by the European Council on 29 April
2017 which provides for Northern Ireland automatically becoming part of
the EU in the event of a future united Ireland.

This declaration known in Brussels as ‘The Kenny Text’ is similar to that
of Commission President Jacque Delors in January 1990 on the issue of
German Unification ‘East Germany is a special case’.
Section 3 Recommendations

It is recognised that World Trade Organisation rules and a hard border
would have a detrimental impact on Ireland North and South & Further
impact assessment is required on the economic impact of reunification.

The Committee urges that the matter of EU funding for Northern Ireland and
the border region remains high on the agenda and an expeditious solution is
found for successor programmes after 2020.

Section 4 Recommendations

The establishment of a New Ireland Forum 2 is recommended to set a
pathway to achieve the peaceful reunification of Ireland.

Establish an international task force with experts in security so that plans to
meet any risks may be devised and implemented.

Fears and concerns of the Unionist community need to be examined,
understood and addressed comprehensively by all stakeholders in advance
of any referendum.

The legacy issues in society outlined by Senator Frances Black and the
inter- generational impact of the troubles in terms of mental health
consequences and substance abuse needs to be addressed
Section 5 Recommendation

Explore potential solutions to resolve disputes that may arise from the
implementation of the Good Friday Agreement, as recommended by High Court
Justice Kevin Humphreys.

Section 6 Recommendation

Lessons from referendums need to be learned to ensure that the Irish
government fulfils its constitutional obligations.

Section 7 Recommendation

The Government needs to carry out an audit in relation to the
legal and constitutional changes pre and post-unification

Submissions and Appendices

Section 1 Submissions 

‘Irexit’ submission by Ray Bassett

‘Brexit and the Border’ Taoiseach Bertie Ahern

‘Northern Ireland and EU Funding versus EU Contribution’  John Teahan

‘UN Human Development Index’ by the Oireachtas Library and Research Service

Section 2 Submissions

‘The European Parliament and German Unification’ by Marc Birchen

 

Section 3 Submissions

‘Modelling Irish Unification’ by KLC Consulting

Section 4 Submissions

‘Ireland and the UK from 1916 to Brexit’ by Martin Mansergh

‘Understanding the ‘Northern Irish’ Identity’ by John Garry and Kevin McNicholl

‘Threat of Violence’ Pat Finucane Centre

‘Counter Terrorism’ by Michael Ortiz, Obama security Advisor

Congressional Friends of Ireland US political support

‘Lessons learned by German Unification’ by Christian Tomuschat

Note on North South Border policy by TK Whitaker

‘Political Party positions on the Unity of Northern Ireland

‘The Process of EU membership following German Unification’ by Dr. Marcus Kotzur

RJN Security Council report on operation in Cypress

‘South Korea Unification Process’ by Marcus Nolan

‘General Brady and Articles 2 and 3 of the Constitution’ by the Oireachtas Library and Research Service

‘Irish Parliamentarian Attitudes to Irish Unification’ by Fr. Sean McGraw

‘Joint Sovereignty’ Oireachtas Research Service

Behaviour and Analysis poll results attitude to the future state

Red C poll results on the Unification of Ireland

‘End of the beginning, reflection on Brexit and prospects’ by Kevin Meagher

Section 5 Submissions

The Good Friday Peace Agreement

Section 6 Submissions

‘The reasons for the defeats of the 1980 and 1995 Referendums in Quebec on sovereignty’ by the Oireachtas Library and Research Service

‘Scottish Independence Referendum 2014’ House of Commons research paper

Section 7 Submissions

Every Treaty signed between Ireland and England

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Watch: Senator Daly questions Minister Coveney on the impact of Brexit on the Border and Peace Process

I join others in congratulating the Tánaiste on his hard work and that of his officials. We all support their efforts. His recent trip to the US was a great success, in that it galvanised Irish America. The support of Congressman Richard Neal and the House Ways and Means Committee is enormous, as it sent a message to the UK that Irish America and its powerful position on that committee, which will decide on the future trade arrangements between the US and the UK, will not support any trade arrangement. When we met Congressman Neal and other Irish American Congressmen, they told us that they wanted to know where the border between the UK and Ireland and the EU would be and how it would function. They wanted Britain to sign up to the backstop, which people seem to forget it negotiated. Those congressmen are concerned about the Good Friday Agreement and the peace.

We are discussing the Border poll and related matters. The issue of unification is not just a name or aspiration. As the former Attorney General, Mr. Rory Brady, stated, achieving it is a constitutional imperative and an obligation, not simply an aspiration to have. The policy neglect in that context that we are currently suffering needs to be resolved. I agree with Deputy O’Dowd about the roadmap, but one of the concerns about that relate to the Belfast High Court case last year in which Mr. Justice Paul Girvan ruled that, although it would be prudent for the Secretary of State to have a policy on how a referendum would be called and how she would determine that the majority of people were in favour of a referendum, he could not legally require her to do so. Although we need clarification in this regard, it is not a matter for the next 36 days. That conversation around a new agreed Ireland – a vision that we can all share of the best future for everyone in the island – is probably not for the 36 days.

I wish to bring the Tánaiste’s attention to a report – I partly assisted in compiling it – by two experts on preventing violent extremism. Professors Pat Dolan and Mark Brennan are chairs in UNESCO. This is about having facts. Their view is that, if there is a return to a hard border, there will be a return to violence. The question is the scale of the violence. It is important for the UK Government to listen. It needs to know. When the UK had its debate on the Brexit referendum, it did not have the facts. If the UK Government is deciding to do a U-turn on the backstop, it needs to be aware of the fact that there will not just be economic consequences for this island, but also circumstances that we do not want to see returning. There was a reason for the Good Friday Agreement and the backstop, and it is the reason we do not want a U-turn on the latter.

I thank the Chair for allowing me to contribute and the Tánaiste for attending the meeting.

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Economist who helped reunify the two halves of Germany says United Ireland wouldn’t break the nation’s finances

A UNITED Ireland would not break the nation’s finances, claims an economist who helped reunify the two halves of Germany.

 

https://www.thesun.ie/news/3770331/economist-united-ireland-costs-finances/

 

Brexit has led to increased speculation about a 32-county Republic with Sinn Fein demanding a border poll.

And surveys show people are more open to the idea than ever before while even British PM Theresa May admitted the UK “union will only endure” if there is no hard border on this island.

It had been widely believed a united Ireland would cost us €10.4billion as we would have to find the cash to cover the British subvention.

With three million people working on the island, that leaves a potential cost of €3,467 per taxpayer.

But that figure has been rubbished in a report compiled by Fianna Fail Senator Mark Daly and Gunther Thumann, a senior IMF economist during the reunification of East and West Germany at the end of the Eighties.

Thumann instead found the deficit would “come close to a balanced budget” and be as low as €799million or €266 for each employee — the equivalent of an extra property tax.

And according to Thumann’s research, Ireland would not pick up the €3.19bn pension bill. Instead, that would still fall to the British because the money was paid into schemes before the North and South came together.

Senator Daly said: “People say we cannot afford Northern Ireland but then do they know the facts? I found the only economist alive with first-hand experience of German reunification and he looked at the figures.”

The Kerryman has also brought out a report on the prospects of a return to violence in the case of a hard border or a rushed border poll.

It was compiled from research by UNESCO chairs Professor Pat Dolan and Professor Mark Brennan and Michael Ortiz, who was a security adviser to former US President Barack Obama.

According to the paper: “In as little as six weeks it is possible that a hard border could materialise due to a no-deal Brexit, triggering a return to violence in Northern Ireland.”

Daly wants a border poll, but only after all the preparatory work has been done.

“The demographic shift in Northern Ireland also shows there will be a nationalist voting majority by 2023/2024. So we have five years to plan.”

But he added: “We need proper engagement, acknowledging the past, educating people about the real consequences of violence.”

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February 2019 Tracking Poll

2019 Feb Q12019 Feb Q22019 Feb Q32019 Feb Q42019 Feb Q52019 Feb Q6

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Northern Ireland Returning to Violence as a Result of a Hard Border due to Brexit or a Rushed Border Poll: Risks for Youth Research Report

Full Report UNESCO Professor’s Report on Return to Violence

Return to violence cover

FOREWORD

In 2017 I was honoured to be appointed Rapporteur for the first report in the history of the state by a Dáil or Senate committee on achieving a united Ireland. The 1,232 page report ‘Brexit & the Future of Ireland: Uniting Ireland & its People in Peace & Prosperity’             was adopted unanimously by the All Party Joint Committee on the Implementation of the Good Friday Agreement

One of the key recommendations in this report is to:

Establish an international task force with experts in security so that plans to meet any risks may be devised and implemented.’

Following on from this recommendation I began working with global experts on the issue of counter terrorism and the prevention of radicalization. Those who helped carry out this study were initially asked to assist in carrying out research on maintaining the peace in Northern Ireland in advance of a border poll.

The remit of the research expanded due to the realisation that there could be a return of a hard border on the Island because of a no deal Brexit. The genuine fear is that as a consequence of a return to a hard border there will be a return to violence in Northern Ireland.

Those who helped me compile this report on a return to violence in the event of a hard border or preventing violence in advance of a premature border poll on a united Ireland are experts in the area of Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) and Counter Terrorism.

I am grateful to the experts who have contributed to this report including Michael Ortiz, Professor Pat Dolan and Professor Mark Brennan.

Michael Ortiz was appointed by Secretary of State John Kerry to serve as the first US diplomat focused on countering violent extremism (CVE) policy at the Department of State. As Deputy Counterterrorism Coordinator, Ortiz led diplomatic efforts to persuade foreign governments and the UN to implement CVE policies and programmes. Previously, he served as Senior Advisor to the National Security Advisor at the White House, was the Director for Legislative Affairs at the National Security Council, and worked in the White House Office of Legislative Affairs. Earlier in his career, he worked in the offices of Senators Obama and Reid.

Professor Pat Dolan is Director of the UNESCO Child and Family Research Centre at the National University of Ireland, Galway and holds the prestigious UNESCO Chair in Children, Youth and Civic Engagement, the first to be awarded in the Republic of Ireland. Professor Dolan and his team deliver a comprehensive research and education programme of work towards the objective of promoting civic engagement and leadership skills among children and youth, including resiliency building and empathy education. He has worked with and for families as a practitioner, service manager, and academic. Professor Dolan has completed an extensive body of research on family issues including Family Support and Prevention, a longitudinal research on adolescents, their perceived mental health, resilience and social support. He is joint founder of the ‘Youth as Researchers’ international programme and has published vastly in a wide range of academic publications. He has acted as child youth and family policy and practice advisor to national and international NGOs and Governments around the world.

Professor Mark Brennan is the UNESCO Chair for Community, Leadership, and Youth Development and Professor of Leadership and Community Development at the Pennsylvania State University. Professor Brennan’s teaching, research, writing, and program development concentrate on the role of civic engagement, leadership, agency, and empathy in peacebuilding, youth and community development process. His work has also increasingly focused on the role of youth as active contributors to peace building, social justice, and functioning societies. Professor Brennan has over 25 years of experience in designing, conducting, and analysing social science research related to community and youth development. This work has involved extensive comparative research throughout Ireland, the United States, Europe, Africa, Asia and Central/South America.

Professors Brennan and Dolan are co-founders of the Global Network of UNESCO Chairs on Children, Youth, and Community, which includes the UNESCO Chair programme at the University of Ulster, and UNESCO Chairs in Uganda, Brazil, Korea, USA, and Mexico. Through this network and their related work, they have been at the forefront of UNESCO research, programming, and policy in the area of Preventing Violent Extremism (PVE).

The UNESCO Chairs praise the great work that is being done and has been done in Northern Ireland that has helped transform many parts of the society. However they do point out that some in the ‘Agreement Generation’, particularly those youths living in the most deprived communities, are suffering from a ‘Loss of memory of harm’. They were born in the decade before and since the Good Friday Agreement. Thankfully they have no first-hand memory of the destruction and devastation of the troubles. However some have been given a distorted version of the troubles.

The challenge for us all is to make sure the peace process is not jeopardised by a return to a hard border due to Brexit or a premature border poll. The peace won by previous generations must not be jeopardised by the current generations and that peace must be passed on intact for generations to come.

Senator Mark Daly

Seanadóir Marcus O’Dalaigh

 

 

 

 

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