Category Archives: A United Ireland in Peace and Prosperity

Fianna Fál believe in the stable, peaceful and prosperous reunification of Ireland and its people.

Fianna Fáil supports the comprehensive engagement between all Parties and people in the north regarding the economic, social and political conditions necessary to create the correct circumstances under which the reunification of Ireland can be obtained.

Express – “UK goods will have a Irish back door into Europe irrespective of Brexit outcome – senator”

BRITISH firms will have an unofficial back door into Europe irrespective of the Brexit talks if Government proposals go ahead, it was claimed today.

By Darren Hunt, Express: http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/841717/Brexit-news-Northern-Ireland-border-customs-union-BBC-latest-video-Republic-of-Ireland

Fianna Fáil senator Mark Daly said the border between the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland would effectively promote a “smugglers charter” as UK firms realised they had a soft entry to EU markets.

The Irish politician said the report released by the Government over the customs union would transform the Irish border to a “back door into Europe”.

Speaking on Radio 4’s Today programme, Mr Daly claimed the Republic and north already had an issue with smuggling and the British Government’s plans would increase problems.

The Irish politician said the report released by the Government over the customs union would transform the Irish border to a “back door into Europe”.

Speaking to Radio 4’s Today programme, Mr Daly claimed the Republic and north already had an issue with smuggling and the British Government’s plans would increase problems.

He said: “Ireland wants to have the best deal on Brexit for Britain and it is vital for the peace process that there is no reimposition of border posts or border checks on this island.

Mr Daly continued with his explanation of why the Irish border would be transformed into a “smugglers charter” from people acting dishonestly.

He added: “But what you are not talking about is the people who are going to be dishonest.

“If there are trade differentials between the UK and other non-European partners, our border would be a back door into Europe.

“So people would import goods that are cheaper under tariff arrangements with the UK and then bring them into the Republic and into the EU.

“Of course the UK want to advantage economically over the EU and will do preferential trade agreements with non-EU countries and that becomes a smugglers charter on this island

“We already have a smuggling problem while both jurisdictions are within the EU.”

On Tuesday the Department for Exiting the European Union released a report explaining how the UK would push for a customs partnership with the EU after Britain has exited from the bloc.

The proposals set out would see Britain and the EU enforcing each other’s customs rules so there would be no need for a new physical border post-Brexit.

Mr Verhofstadt took to Twitter to remind the UK it should instead focus on citizen rights and the Brexit divorce bill as a priority in its exit proceedings.

He tweeted: “To be in & out of the Customs Union & ‘invisible borders’ is a fantasy. First need to secure citizens rights & a financial settlement.”

Responding to the paper released by the UK Government, Mr Daley tweeted: “A smugglers charter on this island being proposed by the brexiteers. ‘Cake & Eat it’ policy moves to ‘Pie in the Sky’.

 

Advertisements

Comments Off on Express – “UK goods will have a Irish back door into Europe irrespective of Brexit outcome – senator”

Filed under A United Ireland in Peace and Prosperity

Reuters – “Britain seeks Brexit without borders for Northern Ireland”

By William James and Conor Humphries, Reuters: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-eu-ireland-idUSKCN1AV2KX

Some 30,000 people cross the 500-km (300-mile) border every day without customs or immigration controls; negotiators must work out new arrangements without inflaming tensions in a region that suffered decades of bloody turmoil before a peace deal in 1998.

As part of a series of papers that Prime Minister Theresa May hopes will push forward talks with the EU, the government on Tuesday outlined its vision for a “frictionless” customs system, which one EU politician described as ‘fantasy’.

Wednesday’s publication drew heavily on those proposals as a solution for Northern Ireland that would not involve “physical border infrastructure and border posts”, or electronic surveillance. Reaching agreement with the EU on this was top of Britain’s list of Brexit priorities, the government said.

The aim is “to find a practical solution that recognizes the unique economic, social and cultural context of the land border with Ireland, without creating any new obstacles to trade within the UK,” Northern Ireland minister James Brokenshire said.

May also said Britain would consider stepping in to replace some EU funding for peace projects in Northern Ireland after it leaves the bloc in March 2019, to prevent a resurgence of violence between pro-British Protestants and Catholic Irish nationalists.

Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney welcomed the proposals, saying Britain had acknowledged for the first time that it would not be practical to depend on technological solutions to monitor the border.

“Of course what we don’t have, though, is the detail as to how it’s going to work,” he said.

But Senator Mark Daly, deputy leader of Ireland’s opposition Fianna Fáil party, said the proposals for a frictionless border appeared “more like fiction, and clueless on this island”.

“It will be a smugglers’ charter,” he told BBC Radio Four.

Northern Ireland sold 2.7 billion pounds ($3.5 billion) of goods into Ireland in 2015, according to official figures, and many businesses have complex supply chains that involve crossing the border multiple times during the production process.

The Sinn Fein party, which wants a referendum on ending British rule in Northern Ireland and uniting the island under the Irish flag, said it doubted an open border could be delivered.

“They have not put anything concrete on the table . ….we are a fleeting concern to the British government, collateral damage in the Brexit negotiations,” said Michelle O’Neill, Sinn Fein’s leader in Northern Ireland.

Britain said it wanted to maintain the Common Travel Area (CTA), a pact that allows free movement between the United Kingdom and Ireland for British and Irish citizens, with no need for passport controls and “no question of new immigration checks operating between Northern Ireland and Ireland”.

That would mean EU citizens wishing to enter Britain could do so by traveling legitimately to Ireland and crossing the border unchecked – something that is likely to antagonize the many Britons for whom controlling immigration was a key reason for backing Brexit.

“If you don’t have any of these checks between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland – the UK-EU border – and you don’t have any between Northern Ireland and Great Britain, well then, where do you check immigration?” Conor McGinn, a spokesman for the opposition Labour Party, told Sky News.

“It seems to me that the government has handed back control of its border to the EU.”

The government said control over migration from the EU into Britain could be exercised by restrictions on access to the British social security system and labor market. Further details would be set out in a future document on immigration.

Britain also wants to introduce new ‘trusted trader’ arrangements to help larger companies and make smaller firms exempt from customs processes.

It rejected the idea of an effective customs border in the Irish Sea that separates England, Wales and Scotland from Ireland and Northern Ireland as “not constitutionally or economically viable”.

Comments Off on Reuters – “Britain seeks Brexit without borders for Northern Ireland”

Filed under A United Ireland in Peace and Prosperity

The New York Times – “U.K. Sets Out Goals for an Open Irish Border. Trade Is More Complex.”

LONDON — The militarized checkpoints that once stood along the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland became flash points for sectarian violence during the Troubles, and no one wants to see their return after Britain quits the European Union in 2019.

But a document released by the British government on Wednesday on how to preserve the open border there has underscored the sprawling complexity of Britain’s planned departure from the bloc, known as Brexit.

Northern Ireland is a part of the United Kingdom, while Ireland has been an independent nation since 1921. Both are members of the European Union — a shared status that has helped London and Dublin put aside historical differences and develop such a close relationship that border controls have disappeared. Travelers generally do not even know when they have passed from one country to the other.

After Brexit, however, the roughly 300-mile frontier with Ireland will be the United Kingdom’s only land border with a bloc whose economic arrangements, including its customs union and single market, it plans to leave. That creates a host of problems.

The customs union allows members to trade freely among themselves while charging a single tariff on some goods from nonmembers. When Britain leaves the bloc, goods crossing the border from Britain into Ireland could be subject to varying tariffs, unless the British adopt the same tariffs as the European Union or strike a special deal with it. Policing those varying tariffs could be burdensome.

The same principle holds for the single market. It is maintained through a complex and detailed set of standards that Britain would either have to abide by or face the logistical nightmare of checking goods entering the European Union from its territory.

Adopting the same tariffs and standards as the European Union would clear up a lot of problems, but would undermine the supposed purpose of Brexit in the first place, which is to re-establish control over immigration and national sovereignty. It would also complicate, or perhaps even preclude, forging trade deals with countries like the United States, another major goal of Brexit.

The document published on Wednesday represents the first, if somewhat vague, attempt to deal with these problems as they affect the Irish frontier. It rules out the reintroduction of physical infrastructure such as customs posts, and there appear to be no plans to use security cameras or license plate recognition technology at or around the border.

Immigration would not be policed at the Irish frontier, nor would there be passport checks on people entering mainland Britain from Northern Ireland.

That would seem to raise the possibility that European Union citizens could enter Britain indirectly through Ireland, perhaps undermining control over immigration. But the document hints that European citizens would probably be allowed to enter Britain freely and directly from Europe even after Brexit, though they might face some restrictions on their right to work or to claim welfare payments as people from outside the European Union do today.

The bigger problem is trade. The European Union’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, warned last month that “frictionless trade” would not be possible if the United Kingdom left the bloc’s economic arrangements.

Wednesday’s document calls on the European Union to agree to a series of waivers for small businesses and farmers, to avoid the need for them to complete customs formalities.

But that is only part of the problem. Even if that were agreed, larger companies would surely face higher costs. The British government is hazy on this point, talking about setting up simplified customs procedures and applying technologies — so far unspecified — to track goods, reduce bureaucracy and prevent costly delays.

British officials say there is so far no estimate of the increased cost that some businesses would face. Stephen Martin, the director general of the Institute of Directors, a business lobby group, described the document as a “significant step forward,” while adding that it “throws up even more questions about how much flexibility and imagination will be needed to overcome some very fundamental challenges.”

John Bruton, a former Irish prime minister, said the document failed to address the need for tariffs to be collected by Ireland on some goods imported into the European Union. “Brexit is going to increase the cost of doing business,” he told the BBC.

Farmers may have to adapt, too. More than 10,000 pigs are exported from Ireland to Northern Ireland every week, while a quarter of all milk produced by dairies in Northern Ireland is exported to Ireland for processing.

To minimize disruptions to trade, the document suggests setting common regulatory standards on agricultural products traded between the United Kingdom and the European Union. Yet that could complicate London’s efforts to strike global trade deals with countries such as the United States, if they involve importing agricultural goods.

Ireland’s government gave the document a polite but cautious reception, with its foreign minister, Simon Coveney, welcoming the principles behind its approach. Yet he added, according to the Irish broadcaster RTE, “What we don’t have, though, is the detail as to how it’s going to work.”

Mark Daly, a senior member of Ireland’s opposition Fianna Fail party, was less diplomatic, describing the plan as “pie in the sky” and warning that the proposals amounted to a “smugglers’ charter.”

Comments Off on The New York Times – “U.K. Sets Out Goals for an Open Irish Border. Trade Is More Complex.”

Filed under A United Ireland in Peace and Prosperity, Brexit & The Future of Ireland Report

Congressman Murphy from Pennsylvania who has been interested in the issue of Ireland for many years discussed my report on ‘Uniting Ireland In Peace & Prosperity’

Congressman Murphy

Comments Off on Congressman Murphy from Pennsylvania who has been interested in the issue of Ireland for many years discussed my report on ‘Uniting Ireland In Peace & Prosperity’

May 18, 2017 · 1:49 pm

On the Claire Byrne Live show discussing a United Ireland

Comments Off on On the Claire Byrne Live show discussing a United Ireland

Filed under A United Ireland in Peace and Prosperity